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20121202
20121210
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
efficiency that's been brought about by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration first, and then, of course, were increased by the obama administration. it's important to recognize that the eslc report is not political in any way, shape or form. it endorses things that are heartily supported by the right , in some cases, and on the other hand that are supported by people on the left. it's important to recognize you can't just take the parts that you like. you have to take the wholistic approach, which is to, again, maximize u.s. production and to at the same time significantly reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. now, the last thing i'll say before we sit down is it's important to recognize that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. about 70% of our 18.7 million barrel per day use of petroleum in this country is for transportation, and transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. so if you want to reduce the united states' dependence
. get your kicks from that analyst meeting. and united technologies. cvs is the cheapest and best drugstore play p i would be willing to buying ahead of the meeting, particularly if you have a little fiscal cliff panic before thursday. which person's going to come on wednesday and create the buying opportunity for cvs? phillips 66 reminds uz house smart it was to break up the old conoco phillips and perhaps put some focus on how hess could be next. united technologies will give us aw fiscal cliff update and a sense of how aerospace is doing now that goodrich, a premium supplier to 'o'space, is part of the family. on friday scotts miracle grow. endless excuse making for missed quarters. can they explain the poor execution? i'll listen, but frankly i doubt it. also on friday we get november industrial production and capacity utilization numbers. did november really matter or was it all sandy? i think prices were stagnant. but i want to try to figure out whether the new boom in cars and homes could impact industrial production and capacity utilization no matter what. i'm trying to un
been brought about by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration and were increased by the obama administration. the report is not political in any way shape or form. it endorses things that are supported by the right in some cases and that are supported by people on the left. you cannot just take the parts that you like. you have to take the holistic approach, to maximize u.s. production and to reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. the last thing i will say is that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. 70% of our use of petroleum in this country is for transportation. transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. if you want to reduce the united states' dependence on imported petroleum and the related geopolitical issues, particularly in an issue when rising demand is creating a potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum or the prices are set on the wo
this missile? i have progressively gained better technology over time and progressively gained back during number of methods over a number of years and decades. .. the announcement of radar for the ally. do you have an update on that program and other efforts underway or envisioned to increase broadly missile defense, our pasture there, and that of our allies and partners. >> well, yes, i have nothing further to add they are can wanted to discuss that with our allies to determine the times and location so i have nothing more than that. when it comes to missile ballistic defense, there's a problem that affects our partners, allies in the region, as well as the homeland in that we'll continue to wait for opportunity to be able to strengthen our partnerships and our capabilities with our allies to be able to deal with the threats as they e emerge. we're going that today. >> intercepters, anything else? >> at this point in time, i'm not prepared to talk about any of the details of that. i would just say that we continue to look for opportunities to improve our capabilities as the threat set ch
that they have the capacity to be able to build and have the missile technology to be able to use it in ways of their choosing down the road. and this, as i said earlier, would be very destabilizing, i think, to not only the region, but to the international security environment. who's helping them in my assessment of their ability to be able to launch this missile? i think that they have progressively gained better technology over time, and they have progressively gained that through a number of methods over a number of years and decades. to the degree that they will be more successful than they were last time in such a short period of time and how that -- what they've done to correct it, i can't tell you how they assess that. we'll just have to -- should they choose to go ahead with it, we'll just have to see how it goes. >> -- moving into the region to monitor this? >> well, i won't go into the specifics of how we or our allies position ourselves to insure that we understand what's happening, but we do watch this very carefully, watch it very closely. of course, in my role as the pa-com co
in north america is coming greater scrutiny. this technology has been around for 30 years. it is proven to be safe, but the greater the technology the better. keep in mind natural gas well more than $100 a barrel 10 years ago. it is the old addage. high prices are the best cure for high prices. in t past 10 years we brought the technology along where we have this abundance of gas. clearly with the environmental concerns the industry will certainly solve the problem. the profit mode is just too great. melissa: lete ask you about poland. it was one of the most promising plays early on, when they went in and looked around they didn't have as much resources than they thought that is pretty unusual. i found covering this industry for years generally people underestimate what's there. so in this case they overestimated. what happened? >> well, i thinkight here compared tthe united states, we've been punching holes in the fwroupd for the past 15, 20, 30 years. so we have a fairly good idea of the geology. this is all a geology play. so with regards to poland they started punching a few holes.
. jekyll technology parts. >> science, technology, engineering and math are fundamental to the growth of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanism
on these widely dispersed cases, the cdc is turning to technology. one of the ways that we've been doing that is similar to what the fbi does in terms to having a national database of fingerprints of criminals. anytime one of those bugs is isolated, either from a human stool sample or from a food product, what happens is it goes into a network of laboratories that are capable of performing the fingerprints, using standardized methodology. changes in how food is grown and handled, increased international travel, people crammed togethe in uanitary nditions-- all contribute to the emergence of these new and deadlier microbes, but there is another critical factor. david bennett: we now have the threat that our major tools, the antibiotics that we can treat bacterial infections, are being compromised. there's a lot of resistance to antibiotics, both in hospitals and communities, so we're very worried about what will happen there. and this means increased cost, and it also means in some cases we can't effectively treat some infections, or it's much more difficult to treat. stephen ostroff: so
their front organizations, front companies to acquire dual use technology and technology with military application, to plant banking operation, very important for our efforts, such as a bank that is underused treasury sanctions, and the british treasury, is operating out of iran. the iranian drug trade is an especially pernicious activity that is targeting south caucasus. while iran is becoming increasingly a transit country -- iran is running its own front operations such as production, supervised by pharmacists and professional chemists, and trying to run this with the boats into azerbaijan, et cetera. i would like the rest of my presentation to be included in the record and just focus on our policy recommendations. the u.s. needs to expand antiterrorism and drug trafficking cooperation between the u.s. and the three south caucasus states, neutralizing iranian subversive activities, focused intelligence community efforts on electing and neutralizing i were aiming -- activities and financial technology transfer sectors in the region, cooperative with the western and other allies. upho
that the north is testing a ballistic missile technology and violating u.n. resolutions and further destablizing the korean peninsula. so many hot spots in the world today to watch as we welcome you on this friday morning to a brand new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. bill: i'm bill hemmer welcome to you at home. good morning to you, again, martha. we're watching the second launch attempt since kim jong-un took over after his father's death a year ago. the last try failed. here is the head of the u.s. pacific command keeping a watch on this. >> we're approaching once again a potential violation of a u.n. security council resolution and we encourage and the leadership in north korea to consider what they're doing here and the implications on the overall security environment own the careen peninsula as well as in asia. martha: molly henneberg is live. north koreans may have run into a snag with this launch plan which may be biding some time. what can you tell us about it? >> reporter: martha, a weather snag. snow may have slowed north korea's efforts to put the missile together
on the idea that technology is the only answer to our military challenges, that we are only going to fight certain kinds of wars in the future. you know, we say we would never fight another counterinsurgency after vietnam but guess what, we did, and as i look back at all of the times we have used military force since vietnam, when it comes to predicting where we will use our military next, we have a perfect record. >> rose: we are always wrong. >> i have never gotten it right, not once. >> rose: why? >> because the world is unpredictable. and so my mantra when i was secretary was, we need a force that is equipped and trained to provide the maximum possible versatility across the broadest possible range of conflict, because we can't predict what the next conflict will be like and, therefore, we have to train and have as much flexibility and versatility as possible. we can't just prepare for one kind of conflict. > >> rose: you also have said, i think on leaving, that i don't want to be secretary of state when you are fighting these kind of ground wars, you know, with increasing budget deman
that are going to be incredible. you know, we've got great technology that's available. but none of that is worth a damn without the men and women in uniform who are willing to put their lives on the line and help to protect this country. that is the real strength. ^that is the heart and soul of what makes us the strongest country in the world. we owe them as a result of that the finest medical care that this nation can provide. and that's why i'm so grateful that we have the greatest medical healthcare system in the world, right here. and the strength of our system lies in you, and people like you. thousands of dedicated professionals who are committed to caring for our sick and for our injured. it lies with each of you. this, as i have said before, is a place where miracles happen, and you are the miracle workers. today, i want to thank you, along with the entire military medical community, for the exceptional care, the exceptional support you provide our service members, for these men and women in uniform, for their families, and for our military retirees. you give them a second chance at life
have to look across all technologies that we pursue and recognize that the significant technological challenges that have been associated with that program and really, i think, in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've -- the technological part of this defense has donna mazing things in that time frame to be able to produce the caments that are there now. and i'm confident they're going to produce the result you're asking about in the near future. as far as the overall, how you would put a p.a.a. in europe, i came from europe in my last position. and again, it goes back to a discussion for me about europe versus the size and the immensity and vastness of this region, a region even the pacific region in the indopacific and trying to apply that exact model to a defense of this area, i think that would be a stretch for me. however, i think there are opportunities as we look at our alliances, as we look at our growing partnerships, as we look at multilateral organizations who are investing in ballistic missile defense capabilities of their own. if they are
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it will actually create jobs, will bring in technology, will create infrastructure in the supply chain so currently a debate of we are expecting the lower parts of parliament to take a vote on this matter about 7:00 p.m. india time. it seems like it will go through the low herb house, but the big question mark is on the upper house of parliament and that is where the arithmetic doesn't seem to be working in favor of government. foreign investors are going to be watching this very closely because if this is turned back, if there is a u-turn on this poll circumstance it means that walmart cannot open shop here in india. for now, it's back to you. >> thanks for that. that's the latest. we'll see what happens. >>> now over to japan, where election timing may spell budget delays. we have the story from tokyo. >> the election campaign has officially kicked off in japan, but there are worries the budget is not likely to be ready pi the end of this year. they will likely call a special session to elect a new prime minister, then select a cabinet before moving on to budget matters. once they reconvene in ja
. the technology field is a rapidly changing group. think of sony at one time. you now there's a recent survey showing that it's had a lower than some of the korean mfers. >> i find xetra dax performance particularly is fascinating bearing in mind where we are in terms of the macro story and germany might well be floating -- >> certainly a big departure in the sense that the german stock market has typically traded in line with the german economy and this is a big divergence. so that's a change. but looking over time, all stocks have the component of what they call the economic return. speculative return which is it for change and the valuation that the market puts on it. over time, one is a possum gain and the other is zero sum gain. sometimes good news, sometimes bad news. but over time the kind of net being nothing. >> we'll see what happens. good to have you on. we'll be out in westminster, joined by the british shadow business secretarier to. we'll talk currencies. find out why one strategist is bullish on the currency. after the ramp up in m&a that we've seen this year, we'll also speak
. investment talks are still on. south korea technology shashs and ship builders lent support to the kospi, but automakers were in reverse gear. us a railian equities up nearly 1% today with miners and banks ending higher. sensex trading lower by 0.2% back to you. >>> getting reports in from reuters that the tsunami measuring about a meter high is hitting the meyagi prefecture. just getting the report in this report. i don't know whether you can confirm or support that, amy. >> we don't have any information about that. we do however know here in the united states we work with the pacific tsunami warning center and at this time, they have not you issued any warning watches or alerts for the united states areas. but they don't control what is being monitored in japan. >> nhk suggesting that is going on. would that tsunami wave correspondent with the size of quake? >> it certainly could given the location and given the magnitude, that's certainly possible. we're not the people who issue those alerts and monitor the situation, but i'm sure we'll be hearing more about it that from them. >> what
zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global onomy. is just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with cfidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >> i'm robert gray with your fox business brief. t-mobile is finally getting a bite out of apple, adding the tech giant's products to it next year. deutsche telekom didn't mention specific products. ipad and iphone are only products offered. >>> hasbro is latest company moving up payment of its quarterly dividend to avoid higher taxes for shareholders. the dividend payment of 36 cents a share will be sent to shareholders this month instead of next year. >>> general motors is planning to hike prices in india by as much as 3% in the new year. the automaker says the increase is response to escalating input costs and currency fluctuations in the nation. suzuki and hyundai alr
and developers also outperformed. elsewhere south korean automakers and technology majors lent support to the kospi ending higher by 0.4%. in australia, banks rose on expectations of a rate cut. defensive stocks also helped push the asx 200 higher by 0.6%. sensex lost 0.2% today. back to you. >> thanks for that. have a good evening there. meanwhile in china, mainland's factories are printing out more goods. eunice has the details in this report from beijing. >> chinese factories appear to be recovering. the hsbc pmi and the government's official pmi both show a steady improvement for the industry in november. the hsbc pmi final reading came in at 50.5, that's the quickest expansion in over a year. the industry saw a pick up in new orders as well as stronger exports thanks in part to christmas demand. the concern is though about the unevenness of the recovery. the sub indices for employment as well as for small and medium sized companies ticked downwards and that suggested to some that the recovery is mainly led by investment and state owned enterprises. a bigger worry is about the outl
, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >> do you think they're going to find a solution? >> we know a lot about what the opportunities are if we don't. >> they don't want negotiate in public, obviously. >> we encourage congress to put aside the political rhetoric and rise above it to make sure we have revenue necessary in order to move this economy forward. >>> final thoughts and predictiones from our guest host, barry knapp and richard bernstein. barry, what would you tell investors to do right now, you know, for the next month and then next year? >> for the next month, i have defensively positioned. what's worked in an environment where the fed is monetizing debt is stocks with bond like characterist
integration and are still putting enhancements and adding functionality to our technology platform, which is one of the things that our advisers have been concerned about. and we're positioned for growth. so particularly if we get some market in 2013 -- >> that's always the thing. you've got 16,700 retail brokers. >> financial advisers. >> you really want the fiscal cliff to be settled. i mean, this would be awful for you and your firm and for a lot of americans, too. be for financial advisers to have people paralyzed again. it would be the worst case scenario. >> one of the things i said at the investor conference was that we feel like we can grow our business even if the market backdrop remains cautious, which is how it's been now for transactional activity has been lighter. >> a percentage of assets. >> that's a big part of our growth story. we call it our managed accounts platform. we have $556 billion in managed accounts at morgan stanley wealth management. that's one of our two major growth areas. the second being the lending business, which you talked about earlier. we've been work
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)